A BDI-based methodology for eliciting tactical decision-making expertise

Evertsz, R, Thangarajah, J and Ly, T 2016, 'A BDI-based methodology for eliciting tactical decision-making expertise', in Ruhul Sarker, Hussein A. Abbass, Simon Dunstall, Philip Kilby, Richard Davis, Leon Young (ed.) Proceedings of the 24th National Conference of the Australian Society for Operations Research 2016, Canberra, Australia, 16-18 November 2016, pp. 13-26.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title A BDI-based methodology for eliciting tactical decision-making expertise
Author(s) Evertsz, R
Thangarajah, J
Ly, T
Year 2016
Conference name Data and Decision Sciences in Action
Conference location Canberra, Australia
Conference dates 16-18 November 2016
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 24th National Conference of the Australian Society for Operations Research 2016
Editor(s) Ruhul Sarker, Hussein A. Abbass, Simon Dunstall, Philip Kilby, Richard Davis, Leon Young
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Switzerland
Start page 13
End page 26
Total pages 14
Abstract There is an ongoing need to computationally model human tactical decision-making, for example in military simulation, where the tactics of human combatants are modelled for the purposes of training and wargaming. These efforts have been dominated by AI-based approaches, such as production systems and the BDI (Beliefs, Desires, Intentions) paradigm. Typically, the tactics are elicited from human domain experts, but due to the pre-conscious nature of much of human expertise, this is a non-trivial exercise. Knowledge elicitation methods developed for expert systems and ontologies have drawbacks when it comes to tactics modelling. Our objective has been to develop a new methodology that addresses the shortcomings, resulting in an approach that supports the efficient elicitation of tactical decision-making expertise and its mapping to a modelling representation that is intuitive to domain experts. Rather than treating knowledge elicitation, as a process of extracting knowledge from an expert, our approach views it as a collaborative modelling exercise with the expert involved in critiquing the models as they are constructed. To foster this collaborative process, we have employed an intuitive, diagrammatic representation for tactics. This paper describes TEM (Tactics Elicitation Methodology), a novel synthesis of knowledge elicitation with a BDI-based tactics modelling methodology, and outlines three case studies that provide initial support for our contention that it is an effective means of eliciting tactical decision-making knowledge in a form that can be readily understood by domain experts.
Subjects Adaptive Agents and Intelligent Robotics
Keyword(s) BDI Cognitive modelling Knowledge elicitation Tactical decision making
Copyright notice © Springer International Publishing AG 2017
ISBN 9783319559148
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