The effect of attitudes on the occupational safety actions of Australian construction workers: the results of a field study

Lingard, H and Yesilyurt, Z 2003, 'The effect of attitudes on the occupational safety actions of Australian construction workers: the results of a field study', Journal of Construction Research, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 59-69.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title The effect of attitudes on the occupational safety actions of Australian construction workers: the results of a field study
Author(s) Lingard, H
Yesilyurt, Z
Year 2003
Journal name Journal of Construction Research
Volume number 4
Issue number 1
Start page 59
End page 69
Total pages 10
Publisher World Scientific Publishing
Abstract The recognition that unsafe behavior is a factor in the majority of workplace accidents has led to considerable research effort in the behavioral aspects of occupational health and safety (OHS). Much of this research has focused on the effect of external stimuli, such as feedback and rewards, on workers' actions. The role of internal cues, such as workers' beliefs and attitudes towards OHS, on their actual behavior has been less thoroughly investigated. This paper presents the findings of a study in which a sample of Australian construction workers' attitudes towards OHS were explored in indepth interviews and their OHS behavior was directly observed. Measurements were taken before and after the workers attended a first aid training course. The results of the study suggest that the first aid training changed the workers' attitudes towards OHS. In particular, the first aid training appeared to make participants more aware that their own behavior is an important factor in the avoidance of occupational injury and increase participants' perceived probability that they would suffer an accident at work. The training also appeared to reduce participants' willingness to accept prevailing levels of OHS risk and participants' expressed a greater concern about taking risks and a stronger intention to avoid occupational injuries after undergoing first aid training. This change in behavioral intention was reflected in improvements in safety behavior observed in the categories of housekeeping, use of tools, personal protective equipment and access to heights. However, no improvements in manual handling were observed. The results of the study are presented and discussed in terms of Ajzen's theory of planned behavior.
Subject Building Construction Management and Project Planning
Keyword(s) attitudes
occupational safety
planned behaviour
first aid training
DOI - identifier 10.1142/S1609945103000303
Copyright notice World Scientic Publishing Company
ISSN 1609-9451
Versions
Version Filter Type
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 249 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 04 Oct 2010, 13:29:39 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us