A qualitative evaluation of breast cancer survivors' acceptance of and preferences for consumer wearable technology activity trackers

Nguyen, N, Hadgraft, N, Moore, M, Rosenberg, D, Lynch, C, Reeves, M and Lynch, B 2017, 'A qualitative evaluation of breast cancer survivors' acceptance of and preferences for consumer wearable technology activity trackers', Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 25, no. 11, pp. 3375-3384.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

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Title A qualitative evaluation of breast cancer survivors' acceptance of and preferences for consumer wearable technology activity trackers
Author(s) Nguyen, N
Hadgraft, N
Moore, M
Rosenberg, D
Lynch, C
Reeves, M
Lynch, B
Year 2017
Journal name Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume number 25
Issue number 11
Start page 3375
End page 3384
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer link
Abstract Background; Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour are common amongst breast cancer survivors. These behaviours are associated with an increased risk of comorbidities such as heart disease, diabetes and other cancers. Commercially available, wearable activity trackers (WATs) have potential utility as behavioural interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour within this population. Purpose; The purpose of the study is to explore the acceptability and usability of consumer WAT amongst postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Methods; Fourteen participants tested two to three randomly assigned trackers from six available models (Fitbit One, Jawbone Up 24, Garmin Vivofit 2, Garmin Vivosmart, Garmin Vivoactive and Polar A300). Participants wore each device for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week washout period before wearing the next device. Four focus groups employing a semi-structured interview guide explored user perceptions and experiences. We used a thematic analysis approach to analyse focus group transcripts. Results; Five themes emerged from our data: (1) trackers' increased self-awareness and motivation, (2) breast cancer survivors' confidence and comfort with wearable technology, (3) preferred and disliked features of WAT, (4) concerns related to the disease and (5) peer support and doctor monitoring were possible strategies for WAT application. Conclusions; WATs are perceived as useful and acceptable interventions by postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Effective WAT interventions may benefit from taking advantage of the simple features of the trackers paired with other behavioural change techniques, such as specialist counselling, doctor monitoring and peer support, along with simple manual instructions.
Subject Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Cancer survivors
Breast cancer
Physical activity
Sedentary behaviour
Wearable technology
DOI - identifier 10.1007/s00520-017-3756-y
Copyright notice © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017
ISSN 1433-7339
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