A living lab study of query amendment in job search

Salehi, B, Spina, D, Moffat, A, Sadeghi, S, Scholer, F, Baldwin, T, Cavedon, L, Sanderson, M, Wong, W and Zobel, J 2018, 'A living lab study of query amendment in job search', in Proceedings of SIGIR '18: The 41st International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research & Development in Information Retrieval, Ann Arbor, United States, 8-12 July 2018, pp. 905-908.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

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Title A living lab study of query amendment in job search
Author(s) Salehi, B
Spina, D
Moffat, A
Sadeghi, S
Scholer, F
Baldwin, T
Cavedon, L
Sanderson, M
Wong, W
Zobel, J
Year 2018
Conference name SIGIR '18: The 41st International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval
Conference location Ann Arbor, United States
Conference dates 8-12 July 2018
Proceedings title Proceedings of SIGIR '18: The 41st International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research & Development in Information Retrieval
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery
Place of publication New York, United States
Start page 905
End page 908
Total pages 4
Abstract Errors in formulation of queries made by users can lead to poor search results pages. We performed a living lab study using online A/B testing to measure the degree of improvement achieved with a query amendment technique when applied to a commercial job search engine. Of particular interest in this case study is a clear 'success' signal, namely, the number of job applications lodged by a user as a result of querying the service. A set of 276 queries was identified for amendment in four different categories through the use of word embeddings, with large gains in conversion rates being attained in all four of those categories. Our analysis of query reformulations also provides a better understanding of user satisfaction in the case of problematic queries (ones with fewer results than fill a single page) by observing that users tend to reformulate rewritten queries less.
Subjects Information Systems Development Methodologies
Information Retrieval and Web Search
DOI - identifier 10.1145/3209978.3210082
Copyright notice © 2018 The Author(s)
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