Larrikin youth: Crime and Queensland's Earning or Learning reform

Beatton, T, Kidd, M, Machin, S and Sarkar, D 2018, 'Larrikin youth: Crime and Queensland's Earning or Learning reform', Labour Economics, vol. 52, pp. 149-159.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Larrikin youth: Crime and Queensland's Earning or Learning reform
Author(s) Beatton, T
Kidd, M
Machin, S
Sarkar, D
Year 2018
Journal name Labour Economics
Volume number 52
Start page 149
End page 159
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier BV
Abstract This paper analyses the impact of the introduction of an Earning or Learning reform on youth crime in Queensland, Australia. The 2006 reform increased learning and reduced earning as school participation rose post-reform, while teen employment fell. Empirical analysis of detailed administrative data reveals that criminal offending fell significantly after enactment of the reform. For males, violent, property and drug crime all declined, while the main effect for females was a significant fall in property crime. The property and drug crime falls are underpinned by a significant incapacitation effect, with some evidence of a persistent crime reduction for young men and women at later ages. Crime reduction resulting from the reform is concentrated in significant falls in the likelihood of ever offending by marginal individuals, rather than lower criminality of recalcitrant persistent offenders.
Subject Labour Economics
Economics of Education
Keyword(s) Earning or Learning reform
Youth crime
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.labeco.2017.11.003
Copyright notice © 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.
ISSN 0927-5371
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