Modest ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers are associated with higher body mass index: Longitudinal analysis of a sample of 15,229 Australians aged 45 years and older in the Australian National Liveability Study

Feng, X, Astell-Burt, T, Badland, H, Mavoa, S and Giles-Corti, B 2018, 'Modest ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers are associated with higher body mass index: Longitudinal analysis of a sample of 15,229 Australians aged 45 years and older in the Australian National Liveability Study', Health and Place, vol. 49, pp. 101-110.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Modest ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers are associated with higher body mass index: Longitudinal analysis of a sample of 15,229 Australians aged 45 years and older in the Australian National Liveability Study
Author(s) Feng, X
Astell-Burt, T
Badland, H
Mavoa, S
Giles-Corti, B
Year 2018
Journal name Health and Place
Volume number 49
Start page 101
End page 110
Total pages 10
Publisher Pergamon Press
Abstract Food purchasing decisions are made within the context of the range of options available, yet most epidemiological studies focus upon single outlet types. Ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers were linked to addresses of 15,229 adults in the 45 and Up Study at baseline (20062008) and follow-up (20092010). Compared to having no fast food outlet but having healthy food outlets within 3.2 km from home, multilevel growth curves revealed that relative exposure>25% fast food outlets were associated with 0.361.19 kg/m2 higher BMI (p<0.05). These associations were consistent as people aged. No associations were observed for food outlets<0.8 km.
Subject Epidemiology
Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Australia
Body mass index
Food environment
Multilevel growth curve modelling
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.10.004
Copyright notice © 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
ISSN 1353-8292
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