Youth codesign of a mobile phone app to facilitate self-monitoring and management of mood symptoms in young people with major depression, suicidal ideation, and self-harm

Hetrick, S, Robinson, J, Burge, E, Blandon, R, Mobilio, B, Rice, S, Simmons, M, Alvarez-Jimenez, M, Goodrich, S and Davey, C 2018, 'Youth codesign of a mobile phone app to facilitate self-monitoring and management of mood symptoms in young people with major depression, suicidal ideation, and self-harm', Journal of Medical Internet Research, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1-42.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Youth codesign of a mobile phone app to facilitate self-monitoring and management of mood symptoms in young people with major depression, suicidal ideation, and self-harm
Author(s) Hetrick, S
Robinson, J
Burge, E
Blandon, R
Mobilio, B
Rice, S
Simmons, M
Alvarez-Jimenez, M
Goodrich, S
Davey, C
Year 2018
Journal name Journal of Medical Internet Research
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 42
Total pages 42
Publisher J M I R Publications, Inc.
Abstract Background: Effective treatment of depression in young people is critical, given its prevalence, impacts, and link to suicide. Clinical practice guidelines point to the need for regular monitoring of depression symptom severity and the emergence of suicidal ideation to track treatment progress and guide intervention delivery. Yet, this is seldom integrated in clinical practice. Objective: The objective of this study was to address the gap between guidelines about monitoring and real-world practice by codesigning an app with young people that allows for self-monitoring of mood and communication of this monitoring with a clinician. Methods: We engaged young people aged 18 to 25 years who had experienced depression, suicidal ideation including those who self-harm, as well as clinicians in a codesign process. We used a human-centered codesign design studio methodology where young people designed the features of the app first individually and then as a group. This resulted in a minimal viable product design, represented through low-fidelity hand-drawn wireframes. Clinicians were engaged throughout the process via focus groups. Results: The app incorporated a mood monitoring feature with innovative design aspects that allowed customization, and was named a "well-being tracker" in response to the need for a positive approach to this function. Brief personalized interventions designed to support young people in the intervals between face-To-face appointments were embedded in the app and were immediately available via pop-ups generated by a back-end algorithm within the well-being tracker. Issues regarding the safe incorporation of alerts generated by the app into face-To-face clinical services were raised by clinicians (ie, responding in a timely manner) and will need to be addressed during the full implementation of the app into clinical services. Conclusions: The potential to improve outcomes for young people via technology-based enhancement to interventions is enormous.
Subject Information and Computing Sciences not elsewhere classified
Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Attempted
Cell phone
Depression
Self-injurious behavior
Suicidal ideation
Suicide
Young adult
DOI - identifier 10.2196/mental.9041
Copyright notice © Sarah Elisabeth Hetrick., et al. Creative Commons Attribution License
ISSN 1438-8871
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