Using communicative ecology theory to scope the emerging role of social media in the evolution of urban food systems

Hearn, G, Collie, N, Lyle, P, Choi, H and Foth, M 2014, 'Using communicative ecology theory to scope the emerging role of social media in the evolution of urban food systems', Futures, vol. 62, pp. 202-212.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Using communicative ecology theory to scope the emerging role of social media in the evolution of urban food systems
Author(s) Hearn, G
Collie, N
Lyle, P
Choi, H
Foth, M
Year 2014
Journal name Futures
Volume number 62
Start page 202
End page 212
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier
Abstract Urban agriculture plays an increasingly vital role in supplying food to urban populations. Changes in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) are already driving widespread change in diverse food-related industries such as retail, hospitality and marketing. It is reasonable to suspect that the fields of ubiquitous technology, urban informatics and social media equally have a lot to offer the evolution of core urban food systems. We use communicative ecology theory to describe emerging innovations in urban food systems according to their technical, discursive and social components. We conclude that social media in particular accentuate fundamental social interconnections normally effaced by conventional industrialised approaches to food production and consumption.
Subject Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
Computer-Human Interaction
Digital and Interaction Design
Keyword(s) Cities
Communicative ecology
Food
Social media
Urban informatics
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.futures.2014.04.010
Copyright notice © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN 0016-3287
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