The dynamic family home: A qualitative exploration of physical environmental influences on children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity within the home space

Maitland, C, Stratton, G, Foster, S, Braham, R and Rosenberg, M 2014, 'The dynamic family home: A qualitative exploration of physical environmental influences on children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity within the home space', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 11, no. 1, 157, pp. 1-1.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title The dynamic family home: A qualitative exploration of physical environmental influences on children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity within the home space
Author(s) Maitland, C
Stratton, G
Foster, S
Braham, R
Rosenberg, M
Year 2014
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 11
Issue number 1
Article Number 157
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Abstract © 2014 Maitland et al. Background: Recent changes in home physical environments, such as decreasing outdoor space and increasing electronic media, may negatively affect health by facilitating sedentariness and reducing physical activity. As children spend much of their time at home they are particularly vulnerable. This study qualitatively explored family perceptions of physical environmental influences on sedentary behaviour and physical activity within the home space. Methods: Home based interviews were conducted with 28 families with children aged 9-13 years (total n = 74 individuals), living in Perth, Australia. Families were stratified by socioeconomic status and selected to provide variation in housing. Qualitative methods included a family interview, observation and home tour where families guided the researcher through their home, enabling discussion while in the physical home space. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results: Emergent themes related to children's sedentariness and physical activity included overall size, space and design of the home; allocation of home space; equipment within the home space; perceived safety of the home space; and the changing nature of the home space. Families reported that children's activity options were limited when houses and yards were small. In larger homes, multiple indoor living rooms usually housed additional sedentary entertainment options, although parents reported that open plan home layouts could facilitate monitoring of children's electronic media use. Most families reported changing the allocation and contents of their home space in response to changing priorities and circumstances. Conclusions: The physical home environment can enhance or limit opportunities for children's sedentary behaviour and physical activity. However, the home space is a dynamic ecological setting that is amenable to change and is largely shaped by the family living within it, thus differentiating it
Subject Community Child Health
Health Promotion
Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Children
Ecological model
Environment
Family interview
Home space
Housing
Physical activity
Qualitative
Sedentary behaviour
DOI - identifier 10.1186/s12966-014-0157-1
Copyright notice © 2014 Maitland et al.; licensee BioMed Central.
ISSN 1479-5868
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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