Comparison of permeation mechanisms in sodium-selective ion channels

Boiteux, C, Flood, E and Allen, T 2018, 'Comparison of permeation mechanisms in sodium-selective ion channels', Neuroscience Letters, pp. 1-6.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Comparison of permeation mechanisms in sodium-selective ion channels
Author(s) Boiteux, C
Flood, E
Allen, T
Year 2018
Journal name Neuroscience Letters
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Abstract Voltage-gated sodium channels are the molecular components of electrical signaling in the body, yet the molecular origins of Na+-selective transport remain obscured by diverse protein chemistries within this family of ion channels. In particular, bacterial and mammalian sodium channels are known to exhibit similar relative ion permeabilities for Na+over K+ions, despite their distinct signature EEEE and DEKA sequences. Atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations using high-resolution bacterial channel structures and mammalian channel models have begun to describe how these sequences lead to analogous high field strength ion binding sites that drive Na+conduction. Similar complexes have also been identified in unrelated acid sensing ion channels involving glutamate and aspartate side chains that control their selectivity. These studies suggest the possibility of a common origin for Na+selective binding and transport.
Subject Soft Condensed Matter
Biological Physics
Physical Chemistry not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Voltage-gated sodium channel
Acid sensing ion channel
Ion permeation
Ion selectivity
Molecular dynamics simulation
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.neulet.2018.05.036
Copyright notice © 2018 Elsevier B.V
ISSN 0304-3940
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