A spatial framework to support scenario planning for Melbourne's Peri-Urban region - planning options for water security and climate change adaption

Buxton, M, Butt, A, Farrell, S, Pelikan, M, Alvarez, A, Densley, L and O'Neil, D 2012, 'A spatial framework to support scenario planning for Melbourne's Peri-Urban region - planning options for water security and climate change adaption', in Proceedings of the 2nd Practical Responses to Climate Change Conference, Canberra, Australia, 1-3 May 2012, pp. 450-461.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title A spatial framework to support scenario planning for Melbourne's Peri-Urban region - planning options for water security and climate change adaption
Author(s) Buxton, M
Butt, A
Farrell, S
Pelikan, M
Alvarez, A
Densley, L
O'Neil, D
Year 2012
Conference name Water and Climate: Policy Implementation Challenges
Conference location Canberra, Australia
Conference dates 1-3 May 2012
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2nd Practical Responses to Climate Change Conference
Publisher Engineers Australia
Place of publication Barton, Australia
Start page 450
End page 461
Total pages 12
Abstract This research developed a quantitative framework that allows examination of current and potential planning scenarios and the impacts of those options on water, biodiversity and agriculture within the context of issues such as food security, water security and climate change impacts. The framework aimed to deliver quantitative information to strategic planners across the peri-urban councils of Melbourne and state government. All peri-urban regions are under pressure from urban development. Peri-urban regions are significant hinterlands to their respective urban areas as key sources for food and water. In the Australian context they represent critical future planning challenges due to their role in food/water security and as areas for sea-change / tree change development and associated climate change related impacts. The framework used a coupling of standard supply/demand and distributed demand (development attractiveness) approaches. The framework was made spatially explicit within a geographic information system (GIS). The attractiveness concept was implemented using a preferencing (Analytical Hierarchy Process) approach that combined a set of criteria derived from previous research into the region. The framework design is modular to enable maximum flexibility in examining different planning scenarios. The research produced a significant body of quantitative information, examples range from the timing, distribution and number of lots in the planning horizon by decade to 2040, to targeting areas that will be under increased pressure due to flow on effects of proposed infrastructure, to quantification of the impact on biodiversity, water supply and intensive agriculture and the required offsets needed to mitigate these impacts by directing development to existing urban centres. The results demonstrate that quantitative analysis of planning scenarios is both possible and practical. The research highlights and quantifies the significant impacts on the peri-urban reg
Subjects Land Use and Environmental Planning
ISBN 9780858259119
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