Identification of opportunities to support structural adjustment in the Latrobe Valley region: Briefing Report Two - Brown coal and power generation: Industry futures, skills and worker relocation

Fairbrother, P, Snell, D, Bamberry, L, Tyler, M, Carroll-Bell, S and Suraci, S 2012, Identification of opportunities to support structural adjustment in the Latrobe Valley region: Briefing Report Two - Brown coal and power generation: Industry futures, skills and worker relocation, Centre for Sustainable Organisations and Work, Melbourne


Document type: Commissioned Reports
Collection: Commissioned Reports

Title of report Identification of opportunities to support structural adjustment in the Latrobe Valley region: Briefing Report Two - Brown coal and power generation: Industry futures, skills and worker relocation
Author(s) Fairbrother, P
Snell, D
Bamberry, L
Tyler, M
Carroll-Bell, S
Suraci, S
Year of publication 2012
Publisher Centre for Sustainable Organisations and Work
Place of publication Melbourne
Subjects Social Change
Abstract/Summary This briefing considers the impacts of possible Latrobe Valley power generator closures on the workforce and the challenges that workers associated with the power industry confront. It discusses the different skills sets, qualifications and types of employment found in the industry and the types of interventions that are needed to assist potentially displaced workers. The Latrobe Valley's lignite reserves are some of the largest in the world. Some 60 million tonnes are mined per annum at the Yallourn, Hazelwood and Loy Yang mines for the four coal-fired power generators located nearby: Hazelwood Power Station, Yallourn Power Station, Loy Yang A, and Loy Yang B. Other current commercial uses of the region's brown coal include the production of char and briquettes. In 2011, three generators - Hazelwood Power Station, Yallourn Power Station and Energy Brix - expressed an interest in the Federal Government's contract for closure programme. Any closure will have significant social and economic ramifications, well beyond the generator workforce. The Latrobe Valley power industry is best conceptualised as a 'flexible organisational network' - lead firms and layered contractors providing goods, services and maintenance. This industry employs at least 4000 workers (around 6 per cent of the regional workforce), and nearly two thirds live in the Latrobe City area. These workers constitute a significant cluster of workers who are among the highest earners in the region and who now face an uncertain future.
Commissioning body The Commonwealth Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport (DRALGAS)
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