Background Paper: Factors pertaining to building resilience in urban slum settlements in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Ahmed, I 2012, Background Paper: Factors pertaining to building resilience in urban slum settlements in Dhaka, Bangladesh, HFHA, Melbourne, Australia


Document type: Commissioned Reports
Collection: Commissioned Reports

Title of report Background Paper: Factors pertaining to building resilience in urban slum settlements in Dhaka, Bangladesh
Author(s) Ahmed, I
Year of publication 2012
Publisher HFHA
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Subjects Urban Analysis and Development
Abstract/Summary This paper provided the background for an AusAID-funded project Building Resilience of Urban Slum Settlements: A Multi-Sectoral Approach to Capacity Building being implemented by Habitat for Humanity Australia (HFHA) in partnership with Habitat for Humanity International, Bangladesh (HFHIB) in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Dhaka is a rapidly urbanising megacity in one of the world's most densely populated and poorest countries. Almost 30% of its more than 14 million population lives in slum settlements. Slum settlements are characterised by tenure insecurity and evictions, and controlled by gang lords who charge exorbitant rents and charges for basic services. Poor quality and densely built housing is typical and basic public infrastructure for water, energy, sanitation and hygiene are non-existent or very limited. A combination of human and natural factors results in various urban hazards with serious impacts on the urban poor, for example widespread flooding and water-logging, exacerbated by poor drainage. Bangladesh has a large number of development agencies, but most do not engage extensively in urban areas. The challenges of building resilience in urban slums are many, but there are also opportunities. Recent government policies as well as emerging interest among agencies to address urban issues offer potential for building resilience in urban slum settlements.
Commissioning body Habitat for Humanity Australia (HFHA)
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