The implications of land issues for climate resilient informal settlements in Fiji and Papua New Guinea

Mitchell, D, Numbasa, G and McEvoy, D 2016, The implications of land issues for climate resilient informal settlements in Fiji and Papua New Guinea, Report for Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), London, United Kingdom


Document type: Commissioned Reports
Collection: Commissioned Reports

Title of report The implications of land issues for climate resilient informal settlements in Fiji and Papua New Guinea
Author(s) Mitchell, D
Numbasa, G
McEvoy, D
Year of publication 2016
Publisher Report for Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Subjects Natural Hazards
Surveying (incl. Hydrographic Surveying)
Urban Policy
Abstract/Summary Future climate change is considered to be one of the most pressing challenges for the Pacific Island Countries (PICs) given their already high levels of exposure to natural hazards, limited capacity to respond, and significant geographical challenges. PICs have a long history of experiencing earthquakes and associated tsunamis, as well as climate-related extreme events such as cyclones. Climate change will act to intensify a range of natural challenges into the future. Sea level rise, in particular, will be critical to the future of low lying atolls in the Pacific (Tuvalu, Marshall Islands and Kiribati being most at risk due to their low elevations), however a heightened sea level will also increase other hazards for nations such as Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Fiji through coastal erosion and land degradation, increased storm surges, and salinization of valuable water supplies. One in four Pacific Islanders is now an 'urban' resident with many of the new rural migrants locating in informal settlements in peri-urban environments. These settlements tend to develop on the least desired land such as hazardprone areas, mud flats or poor quality land subject to drought. They often have limited infrastructure and access to services, limited security of tenure, low levels of adaptive capacity, and are vulnerable to being evicted from their dwelling or losing their access to land and livelihoods after a disaster. This combination of factors makes informal settlers particularly vulnerable to shocks and stresses.
Commissioning body Study sponsored by RICS Research Trust
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