#boulietacks: Carpet tacks and mobile interfaces in the urban politics of cycling in Melbourne, Australia

Chambers, P and Andrews, T 2017, '#boulietacks: Carpet tacks and mobile interfaces in the urban politics of cycling in Melbourne, Australia', City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action, vol. 21, no. 34, pp. 329-347.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title #boulietacks: Carpet tacks and mobile interfaces in the urban politics of cycling in Melbourne, Australia
Author(s) Chambers, P
Andrews, T
Year 2017
Journal name City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action
Volume number 21
Issue number 34
Start page 329
End page 347
Total pages 19
Publisher Routledge
Abstract Since early 2014 small carpet tacks have been persistently dropped on an undulating stretch of road in Melbourne, Australia-ostensibly targeting road cyclists. No one knows where they come from. And yet the recurring presence of these rough-hewn iron nails continue to cause serious injury, property damage and nuisance to those who use this space, all the while flummoxing law enforcement and road maintenance authorities. Our aim in this paper is to follow the interfaces between tack and tyre, finger and phone, image and social media platform, to produce a detailed account of how these mediations are materialised and mobilised politically. Here, we use mobile interfaces to think through the complexity of embodied and deeply material uses of urban space as we narrate the ways in which groups become politically organised through various media. In this dispatch, we trace the development and deployment of a hashtag-#boulietacks-as a means of following this particular Antipodean enigma through the social media and digital communications platforms. Spread on roads and between living people in the city, tacks shape different kinds of political action in response to the anonymous and asymmetrical introduction of hazards into an urban environment customarily adopted for use in road cycling-the lifeless tacks mobilise a lively politics between urban modes of existence.
Subject Criminology not elsewhere classified
Social and Cultural Geography
Urban Sociology and Community Studies
Keyword(s) harm
mobilities
road cycling
social media
vulnerability
DOI - identifier 10.1080/13604813.2017.1325211
Copyright notice © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor and Francis Group
ISSN 1360-4813
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 13 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 14 Dec 2018, 16:06:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us