The Role of Early Life Programming in Vulnerability and Resilience in Relation to HIV

Sominsky, L and Hodgson, D 2017, 'The Role of Early Life Programming in Vulnerability and Resilience in Relation to HIV' in Paul Shapshak; Andrew J. Levine; Brian T. Foley; Charurut Somboonwit; Somboonwit, Elyse Singer; Francesco Chiappelli and John T. Sinnott (ed.) Global Virology II - HIV and NeuroAIDS, Springer Nature, New York, United States, pp. 229-256.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title The Role of Early Life Programming in Vulnerability and Resilience in Relation to HIV
Author(s) Sominsky, L
Hodgson, D
Year 2017
Title of book Global Virology II - HIV and NeuroAIDS
Publisher Springer Nature
Place of publication New York, United States
Editor(s) Paul Shapshak; Andrew J. Levine; Brian T. Foley; Charurut Somboonwit; Somboonwit, Elyse Singer; Francesco Chiappelli and John T. Sinnott
Start page 229
End page 256
Subjects Central Nervous System
Summary Despite significant advances in HIV/AIDS research, the disease still impacts millions of people worldwide. The psychosocial environment of the patient plays an important role in the disease progression. Psychological stress, mental health issues and lack of social support contribute to a poor prognosis, particularly in those patients with prior exposure to these risk factors. Early life stress is known to affect mental health and modulate neuroendocrine and immune function long term, influencing individual's vulnerability to adult stress and compromised health status. This increased susceptibility to the adverse effects of stress may in turn promote the rate of HIV disease progression. Understanding the possible interactions between early life experiences of an infected individual and their ability to cope with the diagnosis and health consequences of HIV infection may shed light on the underlying biological mechanisms contributing to the disease progression and, thus, to improve current therapeutic strategies.
Copyright notice © Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017
Keyword(s) Perinatal programming
Early life stress
Programming of the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis
Sympathetic reactivity to stress
HIV disease progression
DOI - identifier 10.1007/978-1-4939-7290-6_10
ISBN 9781493972906
Versions
Version Filter Type
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 4 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 11:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us