Inundation of a floodplain lake woodlands system: nutritional profiling and benefit to mature Eucalyptus largiflorens (Black Box) trees

Fernando, D, Lynch, J, Reichman, S, Clark, G, Miller, R and Doody, T 2018, 'Inundation of a floodplain lake woodlands system: nutritional profiling and benefit to mature Eucalyptus largiflorens (Black Box) trees', Wetlands Ecology and Management, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 961-975.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Inundation of a floodplain lake woodlands system: nutritional profiling and benefit to mature Eucalyptus largiflorens (Black Box) trees
Author(s) Fernando, D
Lynch, J
Reichman, S
Clark, G
Miller, R
Doody, T
Year 2018
Journal name Wetlands Ecology and Management
Volume number 26
Issue number 5
Start page 961
End page 975
Total pages 15
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Abstract River management continues to challenge riparian systems worldwide, with climate change impacts and anthropogenic extractions escalating. The MurrayDarling basin (MDB) in Australia is critical to agricultural production and habitat provision to maintain biodiversity. Concern for the condition of native trees and biota in the MDB has led to substantial research investment to increase ecosystem function understanding and improve floodplain and wetland management. This field study offers new insights into tree nutrition and physiology as interpreted against the plant-soil-environment dynamics of recent flooding. Black Box (Eucalyptus largiflorens (Myrtaceae) is the only key native riverine MDB tree restricted to that region; and appears stressed at the far reaches of certain significant floodplain ecosystems. Here, nutritional and ecophysiological comparisons were made between Black Box trees that had just been inundated, and those nearby that had not. Leaf stomatal conductance, transpiration, total soil aluminium (Al) concentration, soil pH, and soil conductivity were different between inundated and dry sites. Soil moisture increased due to inundation, thus reducing tree water stress across the three study locations. Changes in leaf chemistry were not detected at the very early stages of flooding examined in this study. An increase in soil acidity due to inundation may also enhance bioavailability of nutrients to trees. New insight into immediate plant benefits gained from this study suggests further investigation is warranted to elucidate the influence of flood and drought on nutrient balance and how future wetland management can benefit from a more holistic understanding of plant-soil-environment dynamics.
Subject Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
Environmental Management
Ecological Physiology
Keyword(s) MurrayDarling basin. Hattah-Kulkyne
Semi-arid
Transpiration
Foliar chemistry
Plant nutrition
Soil acidity
DOI - identifier 10.1007/s11273-018-9623-x
Copyright notice © Springer Nature B.V. 2018
ISSN 0923-4861
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 15 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 11:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us