A Comparison of Four Experiments in Extending Labour Regulation to Non-Standard and Informal Workers

Marshall, S 2018, 'A Comparison of Four Experiments in Extending Labour Regulation to Non-Standard and Informal Workers', International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 281-311.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title A Comparison of Four Experiments in Extending Labour Regulation to Non-Standard and Informal Workers
Author(s) Marshall, S
Year 2018
Journal name International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations
Volume number 34
Issue number 3
Start page 281
End page 311
Total pages 31
Publisher Kluwer Law International
Abstract Workers most exposed to economic risk around the world are commonly not covered by labour law either because laws were designed with people with a standard, continuous employer in mind or because of poor enforcement. According to the International Labour Organizations estimates, informal work, as a percentage of non-agricultural employment, continues to account for over 50% of all employment in half of the countries with comparable data across the globe. In one third of countries, it involves over 65% of workers.1 There are exciting local and national experiments in new forms of labour regulation occurring in various countries that aim to extend labour regulation to non-standard workers, ensuring that they receive living minimum wages. This article compares four experiments in regulating work, including innovations in the regulation of work for head load (Mathadi) workers in India, immigrant industrial clothing outworkers in Australia, garment workers in Cambodia, and workers in Bulgaria who rely on a range of home based activities to survive. The schemes have enjoyed varying success, providing lessons about what does and does not work in different contexts.
Subject Labour Law
Keyword(s) Informal work
non standard workers
labour law
labour regulation
living wages
minimum wages
Copyright notice © 2018 Kluwer Law International BV, The Netherlands
ISSN 0952-617X
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Access Statistics: 7 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 11:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us