Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications

Ahmed, F, Dutta, N, Zannettino, A, Vandyke, K and Choudhury, N 2014, 'Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications', Biomacromolecules, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 1276-1287.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications
Author(s) Ahmed, F
Dutta, N
Zannettino, A
Vandyke, K
Choudhury, N
Year 2014
Journal name Biomacromolecules
Volume number 15
Issue number 4
Start page 1276
End page 1287
Total pages 12
Publisher American Chemical Society
Abstract The aim of this investigation was to understand and engineer the interactions between endothelial cells and the electrospun (ES) polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) nanofiber surfaces and evaluate their potential for endothelialization. Elastomeric PVDF-HFP samples were electrospun to evaluate their potential use as small diameter artificial vascular graft scaffold (SDAVG) and compared with solvent cast (SC) PVDF-HFP films. We examined the consequences of fibrinogen adsorption onto the ES and SC samples for endothelialisation. Bone marrow derived endothelial cells (BMEC) of human origin were incubated with the test and control samples and their attachment, proliferation, and viability were examined. The nature of interaction of fibrinogen with SC and ES samples was investigated in detail using ELISA, XPS, and FTIR techniques. The pristine SC and ES PVDF-HFP samples displayed hydrophobic and ultrahydrophobic behavior and accordingly, exhibited minimal BMEC growth. Fibrinogen adsorbed SC samples did not significantly enhance endothelial cell binding or proliferation. In contrast, the fibrinogen adsorbed electrospun surfaces showed a clear ability to modulate endothelial cell behavior. This system also represents an ideal model system that enables us to understand the natural interaction between cells and their extracellular environment. The research reported shows potential of ES surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.
Subject Biomaterials
Chemical Engineering not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.1021/bm401825c
Copyright notice © 2014 American Chemical Society
ISSN 1525-7797
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 4 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 11:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us