Metabolomic profiles of a midge (Procladius villosimanus, kieffer) are associated with sediment contamination in urban wetlands

Jeppe, K, Kouremenos, K, Townsend, K, Macmahon, D, Sharley, D, Tull, D, Hoffmann, A, Pettigrove, V and Long, S 2017, 'Metabolomic profiles of a midge (Procladius villosimanus, kieffer) are associated with sediment contamination in urban wetlands', Metabolites, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 1-16.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Metabolomic profiles of a midge (Procladius villosimanus, kieffer) are associated with sediment contamination in urban wetlands
Author(s) Jeppe, K
Kouremenos, K
Townsend, K
Macmahon, D
Sharley, D
Tull, D
Hoffmann, A
Pettigrove, V
Long, S
Year 2017
Journal name Metabolites
Volume number 7
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher M D P I AG
Abstract Metabolomic techniques are powerful tools for investigating organism-environment interactions. Metabolite profiles have the potential to identify exposure or toxicity before populations are disrupted and can provide useful information for environmental assessment. However, under complex environmental scenarios, metabolomic responses to exposure can be distorted by background and/or organismal variation. In the current study, we use LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) to measure metabolites of the midge Procladius villosimanus inhabiting 21 urban wetlands. These metabolites were tested against common sediment contaminants using random forest models and metabolite enrichment analysis. Sediment contaminant concentrations in the field correlated with several P. villosimanus metabolites despite natural environmental and organismal variation. Furthermore, enrichment analysis indicated that metabolite sets implicated in stress responses were enriched, pointing to specific cellular functions affected by exposure. Methionine metabolism, sugar metabolism and glycerolipid metabolism associated with total petroleum hydrocarbon and metal concentrations, while mitochondrial electron transport and urea cycle sets associated only with bifenthrin. These results demonstrate the potential for metabolomics approaches to provide useful information in field-based environmental assessments.
Subject Environmental Monitoring
Keyword(s) biomonitoring
Chironomidae
environmental metabolomics
Procladius villosimanus
sediment contamination
DOI - identifier 10.3390/metabo7040064
Copyright notice © 2017 by the authors.
ISSN 2218-1989
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