Housing, neighbourhood and sociodemographic associations with adult levels of physical activity and adiposity: Baseline findings from the ENABLE London study

Nightingale, C, Rudnicka, A, Ram, B, Shankar, A, Limb, E, Procter, D, Cooper, A, Page, A, Ellaway, A, Giles-Corti, B, Clary, C, Lewis, D, Cummins, S, Whincup, P, Cook, D and Owen, C 2018, 'Housing, neighbourhood and sociodemographic associations with adult levels of physical activity and adiposity: Baseline findings from the ENABLE London study', BMJ Open, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 1-10.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Housing, neighbourhood and sociodemographic associations with adult levels of physical activity and adiposity: Baseline findings from the ENABLE London study
Author(s) Nightingale, C
Rudnicka, A
Ram, B
Shankar, A
Limb, E
Procter, D
Cooper, A
Page, A
Ellaway, A
Giles-Corti, B
Clary, C
Lewis, D
Cummins, S
Whincup, P
Cook, D
Owen, C
Year 2018
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 8
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher B M J Group
Abstract Objectives The neighbourhood environment is increasingly shown to be an important correlate of health. We assessed associations between housing tenure, neighbourhood perceptions, sociodemographic factors and levels of physical activity (PA) and adiposity among adults seeking housing in East Village (formerly London 2012 Olympic/Paralympic Games Athletes' Village). Setting Cross-sectional analysis of adults seeking social, intermediate and market-rent housing in East Village. Participants 1278 participants took part in the study (58% female). Complete data on adiposity (body mass index (BMI) and fat mass %) were available for 1240 participants (97%); of these, a subset of 1107 participants (89%) met the inclusion criteria for analyses of accelerometer-based measurements of PA. We examined associations between housing sector sought, neighbourhood perceptions (covariates) and PA and adiposity (dependent variables) adjusted for household clustering, sex, age group, ethnic group and limiting long-standing illness. Results Participants seeking social housing had the fewest daily steps (8304, 95% CI 7959 to 8648) and highest BMI (26.0 kg/m2, 95% CI 25.5kg/m2 to 26.5 kg/m2) compared with those seeking intermediate (daily steps 9417, 95% CI 9106 to 9731; BMI 24.8 kg/m2, 95% CI 24.4 kg/m2 to 25.2 kg/m2) or market-rent housing (daily steps 9313, 95% CI 8858 to 9768; BMI 24.6 kg/m2, 95% CI 24.0 kg/m2 to 25.2 kg/m2). Those seeking social housing had lower levels of PA (by 19%-42%) at weekends versus weekdays, compared with other housing groups. Positive perceptions of neighbourhood quality were associated with higher steps and lower BMI, with differences between social and intermediate groups reduced by ~10% following adjustment, equivalent to a reduction of 111 for steps and 0.5 kg/m2 for BMI. Conclusions The social housing group undertook less PA than other housing sectors, with weekend PA offering the greatest scope for increasing PA and tackling adiposity in this group. Perc
Subject Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) adiposity
ENABLE-london
housing
perceived neighbourhood environment
physical activity
DOI - identifier 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021257
Copyright notice © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) license.
ISSN 2044-6055
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 10 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 11:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us