Lessons learned from delivering an internet intervention for insomnia in an Australian public hospital outpatient setting

Meaklim, H, Abbott, J, Kennedy, G, Murray, G, Klein, B and Rehm, I 2018, 'Lessons learned from delivering an internet intervention for insomnia in an Australian public hospital outpatient setting', Australian Psychologist, pp. 1-10.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Lessons learned from delivering an internet intervention for insomnia in an Australian public hospital outpatient setting
Author(s) Meaklim, H
Abbott, J
Kennedy, G
Murray, G
Klein, B
Rehm, I
Year 2018
Journal name Australian Psychologist
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Abstract Objectives This study examined the feasibility of delivering an online cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia intervention (Sleep‐e) within an Australian public hospital outpatient insomnia clinic. Method This study was conducted as an open trial pilot study. Fifty‐two patients waiting for clinic treatment were invited to participate, with ten commencing and six completing the 7‐week internet intervention. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires regarding their demographic information, sleep and insomnia symptoms, and provided feedback about the program. Exclusion criteria were minimal, and the study allowed for participants to have other health, psychiatric, and sleep disorder co‐morbidities. Results Post‐program satisfaction results suggested that Sleep‐e was easy to use; participants were satisfied with it; and found it beneficial in improving sleep. Paired samples t tests for the intention‐to‐treat sample indicated reductions in participants' insomnia severity (p = 0.02) and sleep onset latency (p = 0.04) from pre‐ to post‐program. However, a larger sample is needed to generalise the results to the wider population. Conclusion The findings support Sleep‐e as a helpful treatment for insomnia in a public hospital outpatient population for at least a subgroup of patients. However, significant lessons were learned regarding the importance of educating health care providers and patients about novel models of internet service delivery. Potential models of adaptive or blended stepped‐care are discussed to facilitate program implementation. Future research should identify how to implement internet interventions more effectively in public health settings to take advantage of their potential to improve clinical efficiency.
Subject Primary Health Care
Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Keyword(s) CBT
clinical/counselling psychology
insomnia
internet intervention
public hospital
stepped-care
DOI - identifier 10.1111/ap.12374
Copyright notice © 2018 The Australian Psychological Society
ISSN 0005-0067
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