From Planning to Wildlife Gardening: Evolving Approaches to Fostering Urban Biodiversity

Mumaw, L, Gaskell, N and Leskovec, C 2018, 'From Planning to Wildlife Gardening: Evolving Approaches to Fostering Urban Biodiversity', in Dr Ian McShane, Dr Elizabeth Taylor, Professor Libby Porter, Dr Ian Woodcock (ed.) Proceedings of the 14th Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference 2018, Melbourne, Australia, 31 January-2 February 2018, pp. 344-353.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title From Planning to Wildlife Gardening: Evolving Approaches to Fostering Urban Biodiversity
Author(s) Mumaw, L
Gaskell, N
Leskovec, C
Year 2018
Conference name Remaking Cities: Urban History Planning History
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 31 January-2 February 2018
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 14th Australasian Urban History Planning History Conference 2018
Editor(s) Dr Ian McShane, Dr Elizabeth Taylor, Professor Libby Porter, Dr Ian Woodcock
Publisher Australasian Urban History Planning History Group and the RMIT Centre for Urban Research
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 344
End page 353
Total pages 10
Abstract The ways urban communities can foster native plants and animals as part of the biodiversity of their neighbourhoods, and the social implications, are being reconceived. Traditionally, nature conservation efforts have focused on protecting threatened species and habitat on public land and educating residents about the need for conservation, with minimal recognition of how households can play active roles on their own land. We see how community champions and personal relationships have influenced how nature is valued and conserved in Knox City (a municipality in Melbourne Australia). We place this story within a historical perspective of nature conservation in cities internationally, and trace the links between planning and conservation in Melbourne. Turning to the present we describe research on an innovative collaboration between a community group and council (Knox Gardens for Wildlife) that engages residents to garden to conserve native biodiversity (wildlife gardening), complementing Knox Council's biodiversity conservation activities. We find that the program provides biodiversity and social benefits to the community, including contributions to participants' wellbeing and connections with nature and community. Underpinning factors include a face-to-face garden assessment, physical hubs for advice and support, visible involvement of volunteers and Council, and the endorsement of each garden's potential conservation contribution. We propose how similar partnerships can reframe the role of urban citizens and households in fostering municipal biodiversity, and suggest future lines of enquiry.
Subjects Conservation and Biodiversity
Environmental Management
Urban and Regional Studies (excl. Planning)
Keyword(s) urban nature conservation
urban biodiversity
environmental planning
wildlife gardening
Copyright notice © The copyright of this volume belongs to Australasian UHPH Group. Copyright of the papers contained in this volume remains the property of the authors.
ISBN 9780995379114
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 30 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 31 Jan 2019, 11:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us