Soft power projection: the political return on investment in international higher education

Ziguras, C 2018, 'Soft power projection: the political return on investment in international higher education' in Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates, Roger King (ed.) Handbook on the Politics of Higher Education, Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, United Kingdom, pp. 167-186.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title Soft power projection: the political return on investment in international higher education
Author(s) Ziguras, C
Year 2018
Title of book Handbook on the Politics of Higher Education
Publisher Edward Elgar Publishing
Place of publication Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Editor(s) Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates, Roger King
Start page 167
End page 186
Subjects Higher Education
Summary This chapter begins by considering the historical roots of cross-border provision, which was until recently overwhelmingly a side-effect of the military and economic domination by colonial powers and Cold War superpowers. The contemporary politics of cross- border education is framed by the particular historical context in which each nation finds itself. One can still see these historical influences on both the patterns of mobility - of students, scholars, programmes and institutions - and also the ideological framework in which those relationships are understood in the present. The legacies of earlier periods of domination and influence often carry on for generations and even centuries. In each country, contemporary patterns of student flows and foreign educational provision are shaped by successive layers of political and economic influence; while these are outcomes of millions of decisions by individual students and their families, government agencies, education providers and employers, in the volume of such flows and the choice of partner country we can see the impact of colonization, Cold War affiliation and contemporary trade relationships as well as geographical proximity. This chapter will then consider some of the key policy objectives that drive governments' thinking in the contemporary era, before considering how these competing objectives align with the interests of powerful actors to shape states' policies relating to cross-border provision. Governments regulate cross-border provision in many ways, such as through their funding policies, their role in recognition of foreign qualifications, through visa policies that determine which students may enter and into which institutions they may enrol, and licensing and accreditation processes.
Copyright notice © Brendan Cantwell, Hamish Coates and Roger King 2018
ISBN 9781786435019
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