Material criticality assessment and resource nexus analysis

Mudd, G 2018, 'Material criticality assessment and resource nexus analysis' in Raimund Bleischwitz, Holger Hoff, Catalina Spataru, Ester van der Voet, and Stacy D. VanDeveer (ed.) Routledge Handbook of the Resource Nexus, Routledge, United Kingdom, pp. 129-148.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title Material criticality assessment and resource nexus analysis
Author(s) Mudd, G
Year 2018
Title of book Routledge Handbook of the Resource Nexus
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication United Kingdom
Editor(s) Raimund Bleischwitz, Holger Hoff, Catalina Spataru, Ester van der Voet, and Stacy D. VanDeveer
Start page 129
End page 148
Subjects Environmental Engineering not elsewhere classified
Summary There has always been basic human needs for reliable water, food, shelter and community - but the past few centuries has seen substantial growth in demands for a range of metals and minerals to meet the demands of new technologies, infrastructure and modern lifestyles, including both civilian and military needs and desires (e.g. Rankin, 2011; von Gleich et al., 2006). Throughout the 20th century the common metals of copper, iron, lead, zinc, nickel, tin, silver and gold found increasingly widespread use in a range of contexts, such as buildings and infrastructure, piping systems for gas, water and sewerage, telecommunications, power transmission systems and electrical wiring, military equipment, munitions and technologies and consumer appliances, among others (e.g. Graedel et al., 2015; Spitz and Trudinger, 2008). The past few decades, however, has seen a major transformation with modern demands now including a considerably wider range of metals for specialty alloys, high-performance electronics (especially mobile phones, flat screens and computers), chemical catalysts, renewable energy technologies (especially wind turbines, solar photovoltaic panels), hybrid electric-petrol or fully electric transport vehicles and military technologies (e.g. NRC, 2008; Skirrow et al., 2013). These new 'technology' metals include indium, molybdenum, gallium, germanium, selenium, tellurium, cobalt, rhenium, the six platinum group elements, the family of rare earth elements (REEs) and perhaps a few others. Given that the demands for technology metals include uses such as consumer electronics and renewable energy, uses which are expected to grow considerably in coming decades, these metals are often considered vital to meet the reasonable technological, social and environmental needs of our 21st century global society - hence they are often labelled as 'critical' due to their fundamental importance.
Copyright notice © 2018 selection and editorial matter, Raimund Bleischwitz, Holger Hoff, Catalina Spataru, Ester van der Voet and Stacy D. VanDeveer; individual chapters, the contributors
ISBN 9781317198826
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 37 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 21 Feb 2019, 12:10:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us