Integration of a short-term international humanitarian engineering experience into engineering undergraduate studies

Smith, J, Turner, J, Brown, N and Price, J 2016, 'Integration of a short-term international humanitarian engineering experience into engineering undergraduate studies', in Proceedings of the 123rd Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education 2016, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, 26-29 June 2016, pp. 20023-20035.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Integration of a short-term international humanitarian engineering experience into engineering undergraduate studies
Author(s) Smith, J
Turner, J
Brown, N
Price, J
Year 2016
Conference name Jazzed About Engineering Education
Conference location New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Conference dates 26-29 June 2016
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 123rd Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education 2016
Publisher American Society for Engineering Education
Place of publication Washington DC, United States
Start page 20023
End page 20035
Total pages 13
Abstract Many of the humanitarian engineering education initiatives in Australia are developed and supported by Engineers Without Borders Australia (EWB-A). These include the EWB Challenge, an embedded first year coursework program, and the Undergraduate Research Program, providing service-learning opportunities for later year individual or group projects. These represent the extremes of an undergraduate degree, leaving a significant gap in the program for a student interested in humanitarian engineering. A link is required to support student learning in humanitarian engineering between these extremes. To fill, the EWB Humanitarian Design Summits were developed. These are two-week international experiences combining facilitated workshops, cultural experiences and a community visit. They provide opportunities for students to engage in a scaffolded community based humanitarian engineering experience. They are available to mid-program students to optional take and are designed to be a lead into later year service-learning projects. At one Australian university a range of curriculum methods have been used to incorporate the experience into students' formal program including work experience, research projects and a for-credit course. These have created different outcomes, with those more tightly integrated into a students' program providing greater opportunities for student learning.
Subjects Engineering not elsewhere classified
Copyright notice © American Society for Engineering Education, 2016
ISBN 9781510834804
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