What were they thinking? Motivations of at-risk students

Dobele, A, Thomas, S and De Silva Perera, D 2017, 'What were they thinking? Motivations of at-risk students', in The Business & Management Review, London, United Kingdom, 6-7 November 2017, pp. 267-273.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title What were they thinking? Motivations of at-risk students
Author(s) Dobele, A
Thomas, S
De Silva Perera, D
Year 2017
Conference name ABRM-CILN International Conference
Conference location London, United Kingdom
Conference dates 6-7 November 2017
Proceedings title The Business & Management Review
Publisher The Academy of Business and Retail Management (ABRM)
Place of publication United Kingdom
Start page 267
End page 273
Total pages 7
Abstract A student is formally classified as at-risk when they fail to meet minimum standards of academic performance. The consequence is exclusion unless performance improves. Our exploratory study seeks to classify the demographics of at-risk students and compare these with personal values, drawn out through in-depth interviews, as influencers of student performance and at-risk status. We also consider engagement with the at-risk process as a possible explanation of and future at risk status. The sample comprises an Australian University operating two multi-cultural campuses in two different countries, Australia and Singapore. The results of such research can have a significant impact on the development of pastoral care and intervention programs to assist students better achieve their learning goals and meet graduation goals for tertiary institutions.
Subjects Marketing Management (incl. Strategy and Customer Relations)
Keyword(s) Attrition
higher education
at-risk
Copyright notice © The Academy of Business and Retail Management (ABRM) Nov 2017
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