Effective Risk Management for In Service Pipelines: Achieving ALARP by Pressure Management and Slab Protection

Carroll, F and Hayes, J 2018, 'Effective Risk Management for In Service Pipelines: Achieving ALARP by Pressure Management and Slab Protection', in Proceedings of the 12th International Pipeline Conference (IPC 2018), Calgary, Canada, 24-28 September 2018, pp. 1-10.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Effective Risk Management for In Service Pipelines: Achieving ALARP by Pressure Management and Slab Protection
Author(s) Carroll, F
Hayes, J
Year 2018
Conference name IPC 2018: Building the Future Now: Volume 2
Conference location Calgary, Canada
Conference dates 24-28 September 2018
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 12th International Pipeline Conference (IPC 2018)
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery
Place of publication United States
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Abstract In Australia (and the UK), pipeline operating companies have a regulatory obligation to ensure that their assets are designed, constructed, operated and maintained so that risk to people and the environment is as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP). In many routine cases, demonstration that risk is ALARP is a matter of compliance with relevant technical standards. There are some cases, however, that are more complex. If a pipeline has been subject to significant urban encroachment and does not conform to current design standards for this service, how does a pipeline operator decide whether risk controls are sufficient? In Australia, rather than either 'grandfathering' requirements or mandating retrospective compliance with new standards, operators are required to ensure pipelines are safe and that risk levels are acceptable. The answer in cases such as this is a matter of judgment and we have legal, moral and reputational responsibilities to get decisions such as this right. There is currently no formal requirement in the US for pipeline risks to be ALARP, although the concept is gradually being introduced to US industry safety law. Examples include US offshore well control rules, California refinery safety regulations and the nuclear sector concept of 'as low as reasonably achievable'. In this paper, we demonstrate application of the ALARP process to a case study pipeline built in the 1960s that has been heavily encroached by urban development. The Australian risk-based approach required formal ALARP assessment including consideration of options to reduce pressure, relocate or replace the pipeline, or increase the level of physical or procedural protection. [truncated due to field restriction]
Subjects Risk Engineering (excl. Earthquake Engineering)
Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment
Keyword(s) Slabs
Pipelines
Risk management
ALARP
DOI - identifier 10.1115/IPC2018-78170
Copyright notice Copyright © 2018 by ASME
ISBN 9780791851876
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