Well-being in vertical cities: beyond the aesthetics of nature

Hayles, C and Aranda-Mena, G 2018, 'Well-being in vertical cities: beyond the aesthetics of nature', in Priyadarsini Rajagopalan, Mary Myla Andamon (ed.) Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA 2018), Melbourne, Australia, 28 November - 1 December 2018, pp. 331-338.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Well-being in vertical cities: beyond the aesthetics of nature
Author(s) Hayles, C
Aranda-Mena, G
Year 2018
Conference name ANZAScA 2018: Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 28 November - 1 December 2018
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA 2018)
Editor(s) Priyadarsini Rajagopalan, Mary Myla Andamon
Publisher Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA)
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 331
End page 338
Total pages 8
Abstract There is a growing recognition of the need for daily contact with nature, to live happy, productive, meaningful lives. Biophilic Design enhances human well-being by fostering connections between people and nature in the built environment. Achieving these benefits has the potential to improve quality of life and provide direct and indirect financial benefits e.g. reduced health care costs, reduced costs of crime and violence, improve productivity and workplace performance, and consequently wellbeing and quality of life. Biophilic Design holds that good design must integrate nature and natural elements. Biophilic design therefore, is a design philosophy that encourages the use of natural systems and processes in the design of the built environment. Biophilic Design is based on Edward O. Wilson's Biophilia hypothesis, which proposes that humans have an innate connection with the natural world and that exposure to the natural world is therefore important for human wellbeing (Wilson, 1984). This paper is a review paper bringing current academic knowledge in the area of biophilia and their relationship to living and working in high-density cities.
Subjects Building Science and Techniques
Land Use and Environmental Planning
Urban Analysis and Development
Keyword(s) architecture
livability
biophilia
biomimetic design
restorative environments
Copyright notice © 2018, All rights reserved and published by The Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Australia
ISBN 9780992383558
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