The potential of new technologies to disrupt housing policy, AHURI Final Report No. 308

Pettit, C, Crommelin, L, Sharam, A and Hulse, K 2018, The potential of new technologies to disrupt housing policy, AHURI Final Report No. 308, Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia


Document type: Commissioned Reports
Collection: Commissioned Reports

Title of report The potential of new technologies to disrupt housing policy, AHURI Final Report No. 308
Author(s) Pettit, C
Crommelin, L
Sharam, A
Hulse, K
Year of publication 2018
Publisher Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Subjects Land Use and Environmental Planning
Housing Markets, Development, Management
Abstract/Summary - The research identified four main fields of technological advancement that are likely to disrupt the housing sector in future, or are already doing so: matching markets; big data; GIS mapping software; and blockchain. - Technological change presents real opportunities for the housing sector, including more efficient allocation of housing stock, more accurate and transparent property management systems, and better informed planning and development processes. - At the same time, however, the most advanced technological disruption to date in the housing space-the matching market Airbnb-highlights the ways in which responding to and regulating disruptive technologies presents new challenges for governments and is challenging for governments. - Key challenges include the protection of privacy, the need to ensure transparency in increasingly complex technological systems, the cost and access risks associated with the commercialisation of significant technological systems, and the potential for disruption in one housing market to cause negative spillover effects in other parts of the housing sector. - In responding to future technological disruptions, governments need more agile and critical policy making approaches to allow effective short-term responses to digital disruptions, as well as strategies for implementing longer-term cultural change and systems upgrades. The report identifies 10 key principles and strategies as a starting point for developing this new policy making 'playbook'.
Commissioning body Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute
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