Differential Regulation of Genes Involved in Root Morphogenesis and Cell Wall Modification is Associated with Salinity Tolerance in Chickpea

Kaashyap, M, Ford, R, Kudapa, H, Jain, M, Edwards, D, Varshney, R and Mantri, N 2018, 'Differential Regulation of Genes Involved in Root Morphogenesis and Cell Wall Modification is Associated with Salinity Tolerance in Chickpea', Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 1-19.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Differential Regulation of Genes Involved in Root Morphogenesis and Cell Wall Modification is Associated with Salinity Tolerance in Chickpea
Author(s) Kaashyap, M
Ford, R
Kudapa, H
Jain, M
Edwards, D
Varshney, R
Mantri, N
Year 2018
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 8
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Nature
Abstract Salinity is a major constraint for intrinsically salt sensitive grain legume chickpea. Chickpea exhibits large genetic variation amongst cultivars, which show better yields in saline conditions but still need to be improved further for sustainable crop production. Based on previous multi-location physiological screening, JG 11 (salt tolerant) and ICCV 2 (salt sensitive) were subjected to salt stress to evaluate their physiological and transcriptional responses. A total of ~480 million RNA-Seq reads were sequenced from root tissues which resulted in identification of 3,053 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to salt stress. Reproductive stage shows high number of DEGs suggesting major transcriptional reorganization in response to salt to enable tolerance. Importantly, cationic peroxidase, Aspartic ase, NRT1/PTR, phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase, DREB1E and ERF genes were significantly up-regulated in tolerant genotype. In addition, we identified a suite of important genes involved in cell wall modification and root morphogenesis such as dirigent proteins, expansin and casparian strip membrane proteins that could potentially confer salt tolerance. Further, phytohormonal cross-talk between ERF and PIN-FORMED genes which modulate the root growth was observed. The gene set enrichment analysis and functional annotation of these genes suggests they may be utilised as potential candidates for improving chickpea salt tolerance. © 2018 The Author(s).
Subject Gene Expression (incl. Microarray and other genome-wide approaches)
Genomics
Crop and Pasture Biochemistry and Physiology
Keyword(s) abiotic stress responses
arabidopsis-thaliana
salt-stress
transcription factor
plant development
contrasting genotypes
cicer-arietinuml.
yield components
oxidative stress
basal immunity
DOI - identifier 10.1038/s41598-018-23116-9
Copyright notice © 2018 The Author(s) Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
ISSN 2045-2322
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