Playing for Fun, Training for War: Can Popular Claims About Recreational Video Gaming and Military Simulations be Reconciled?

Sparrow, R, Harrison, R, Oakley, J and Keogh, B 2018, 'Playing for Fun, Training for War: Can Popular Claims About Recreational Video Gaming and Military Simulations be Reconciled?', Games and Culture, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 174-192.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Playing for Fun, Training for War: Can Popular Claims About Recreational Video Gaming and Military Simulations be Reconciled?
Author(s) Sparrow, R
Harrison, R
Oakley, J
Keogh, B
Year 2018
Journal name Games and Culture
Volume number 13
Issue number 2
Start page 174
End page 192
Total pages 19
Publisher Sage
Abstract In the cultural controversy surrounding violent video games, the manufacturers and players of games often insist that computer games are a form of harmless entertainment that is unlikely to influence the real-world activities of players. Yet games and military simulations are used by military organizations across the world to teach the modern arts of war, from how to shoot a gun to teamwork, leadership skills, military values, and cultural sensitivity. We survey a number of ways of reconciling these apparently contradictory claims and argue that none of them are ultimately successful. Thus, either military organizations are wrong to think that games and simulations have a useful role to play in training anything other than the most narrowly circumscribed physical skills or some recreational digital games do, in fact, have the power to influence the real-world behavior and dispositions of players in morally significant ways.
Subject Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) computer games
ethics
military simulations
video games
violence
DOI - identifier 10.1177/1555412015615025
Copyright notice © The Author(s) 2015
ISSN 1555-4120
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 11 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 26 Mar 2019, 09:36:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us