A Comparison of Temporal Dominance of Sensation (TDS) and Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) to Identify Flavors in Strawberries

Oliver, P, Cicerale, S, Pang, E and Keast, R 2018, 'A Comparison of Temporal Dominance of Sensation (TDS) and Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) to Identify Flavors in Strawberries', Journal of Food Science, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 1094-1102.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title A Comparison of Temporal Dominance of Sensation (TDS) and Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) to Identify Flavors in Strawberries
Author(s) Oliver, P
Cicerale, S
Pang, E
Keast, R
Year 2018
Journal name Journal of Food Science
Volume number 83
Issue number 4
Start page 1094
End page 1102
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Abstract Abstract: Temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) is a rapid descriptive method that offers a different magnitude of information to traditional descriptive analysis methodologies. This methodology considers the dynamic nature of eating, assessing sensory perception of foods as they change throughout the eating event. Limited research has applied the TDS methodology to strawberries and subsequently validated the results against Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA). The aim of this research is to compare the TDS methodology using an untrained consumer panel to the results obtained via QDA with a trained sensory panel. The trained panelists (n = 12, minimum 60 hr each panelist) were provided with six strawberry samples (three cultivars at two maturation levels) and applied QDA techniques to profile each strawberry sample. Untrained consumers (n = 103) were provided with six strawberry samples (three cultivars at two maturation levels) and required to use TDS methodology to assess the dominant sensations for each sample as they change over time. Results revealed moderately comparable product configurations produced via TDS in comparison to QDA (RV coefficient = 0.559), as well as similar application of the sweet attribute (correlation coefficient of 0.895 at first bite). The TDS methodology however was not in agreement with the QDA methodology regarding more complex flavor terms. These findings support the notion that the lack of training on the definition of terms, together with the limitations of the methodology to ignore all attributes other than those dominant, provide a different magnitude of information than the QDA methodology. Practical Application: A comparison of TDS to traditional descriptive analysis indicate that TDS provides additional information to QDA regarding the lingering component of eating. The QDA results however provide more precise detail regarding singular attributes. Therefore, the TDS methodology has an application in industry when
Subject Chemical Engineering not elsewhere classified
Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) descriptive analysis
sensory evaluation
strawberry
temporal dominance of sensations
DOI - identifier 10.1111/1750-3841.14096
Copyright notice Ā© 2018 Institute of Food TechnologistsĀ®
ISSN 0022-1147
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