Chiropractic treatment including instrument-assisted manipulation for non-specific dizziness and neck pain in community-dwelling older people: A feasibility randomised sham-controlled trial

Kendall, J, French, S, Hartvigsen, J and Azari, M 2018, 'Chiropractic treatment including instrument-assisted manipulation for non-specific dizziness and neck pain in community-dwelling older people: A feasibility randomised sham-controlled trial', Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 1-11.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Chiropractic treatment including instrument-assisted manipulation for non-specific dizziness and neck pain in community-dwelling older people: A feasibility randomised sham-controlled trial
Author(s) Kendall, J
French, S
Hartvigsen, J
Azari, M
Year 2018
Journal name Chiropractic and Manual Therapies
Volume number 26
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Abstract Background: Dizziness in older people is a risk factor for falls. Neck pain is associated with dizziness and responds favourably to neck manipulation. However, it is unknown if chiropractic intervention including instrument-assisted manipulation of the neck in older people with neck pain can also improve dizziness. Methods: This parallel two-arm pilot trial was conducted in Melbourne, Australia over nine months (October 2015 to June 2016). Participants aged 65-85 years, with self-reported chronic neck pain and dizziness, were recruited from the general public through advertisements in local community newspapers and via Facebook. Participants were randomised using a permuted block method to one of two groups: 1) Activator II-instrument-assisted cervical and thoracic spine manipulation plus a combination of: light massage, mobilisation; range of motion exercises; and home advice about the application of heat, or 2) Sham-Activator II-instrument-assisted manipulation (set to zero impulse) plus gentle touch of cervical and thoracic spinal regions. Participants were blinded to group allocation. The interventions were delivered weekly for four weeks. Assessments were conducted one week pre- and post-intervention. Clinical outcomes were assessed blindly and included: dizziness (dizziness handicap inventory [DHI]); neck pain (neck disability index [NDI]); self-reported concerns of falling; mood; physical function; and treatment satisfaction. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment rates, compliance with intervention and outcome assessment, study location, success of blinding, costs and harms. Results: Out of 162 enquiries, 24 participants were screened as eligible and randomised to either the chiropractic (n=13) or sham (n=11) intervention group. Compliance was satisfactory with only two participants lost to follow up; thus, post-intervention data for 12 chiropractic intervention and 10 sham intervention participants were analysed. Blinding was similar between groups. Mi
Subject Geriatrics and Gerontology
Keyword(s) Neck pain
Dizziness
Elderly
Chiropractic
Randomised controlled trial
DOI - identifier 10.1186/s12998-018-0183-1
Copyright notice © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
ISSN 2045-709X
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