Instrumental methods (Spectroscopy, Electronic Nose, and Tongue) as tools to predict taste and aroma in beverages: Advantages and limitations

Smyth, H and Cozzolino, D 2013, 'Instrumental methods (Spectroscopy, Electronic Nose, and Tongue) as tools to predict taste and aroma in beverages: Advantages and limitations', Chemical Reviews, vol. 113, no. 3, pp. 1429-1440.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Instrumental methods (Spectroscopy, Electronic Nose, and Tongue) as tools to predict taste and aroma in beverages: Advantages and limitations
Author(s) Smyth, H
Cozzolino, D
Year 2013
Journal name Chemical Reviews
Volume number 113
Issue number 3
Start page 1429
End page 1440
Total pages 12
Publisher American Chemical Society
Abstract The human senses have always been used to assess food quality. Although the senses of sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch are used daily in all aspects of our lives, their analytical applications to evaluate food properties are relatively recent. The sensory systems of Homo sapiens are the product of millions of years of evolution where natural selection has resulted in our capacity to detect a wide range of compounds present in the environment, advantageous to our survival, allowing hedonistic evaluation of the environment. Existing analytical methods used to measure wine and alcoholic beverages composition and quality are not adequate for the demands of production in a global market due to their high cost and slow turnaround time. In the last 20 years increasing interest on the use of rapid screening techniques or instrumental methods to determine quality characteristics of foods and beverages has been of great interest to the food industry.
Subject Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.1021/cr300076c
Copyright notice © 2012 American Chemical Society
ISSN 0009-2665
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