Are young men getting the message? Age differences in suicide prevention literacy among male construction workers

King, T, Batterham, P, Lingard, H, Gullestrup, J, Lockwood, C, Harvey, S, Kelly, B, LaMontagne, A and Milner, A 2019, 'Are young men getting the message? Age differences in suicide prevention literacy among male construction workers', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 475-486.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size
n2006089590.pdf Published Version application/pdf 611.15KB
Title Are young men getting the message? Age differences in suicide prevention literacy among male construction workers
Author(s) King, T
Batterham, P
Lingard, H
Gullestrup, J
Lockwood, C
Harvey, S
Kelly, B
LaMontagne, A
Milner, A
Year 2019
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 16
Issue number 3
Start page 475
End page 486
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI Open access
Abstract Suicide is a leading cause of death among young men. Help-seeking is known to be poor among this group, and little is known about what interventions are most successful in improving suicide prevention literacy among young men. This research aims to examine: (1) age differences in beliefs related to suicide prevention literacy and attitudes to the workplace in addressing mental health among male construction workers; (2) age differences in response to a workplace suicide prevention program. Pre- and post-training survey data of 19,917 male respondents were obtained from a workplace training program database. Linear regression models and predictive margins were computed. Mean differences in baseline beliefs, and belief change were obtained for age groups, and by occupation. Young men demonstrated poorer baseline suicide prevention literacy but were more likely to consider that mental health is a workplace health and safety issue. There was also evidence that young men employed in manual occupations had poorer suicide prevention literacy than older men, and young men employed in professional/managerial roles. The youngest respondents demonstrated the greatest intervention-associated change (higher scores indicating more favourable belief change) to People considering suicide often send out warning signs (predicted mean belief change 0.47, 95% CI 0.43, 0.50 for those aged 15-24 years compared to 0.38, 95% CI 0.36, 0.41 for men aged 45 years and over), and to The construction industry must do something to reduce suicide rates (predicted mean belief change 0.17, 95% CI 0.15, 0.20 for those aged 15-24 years compared to 0.12, 95% CI 0.10, 0.14 among men aged 45 years and over). Results indicate that while suicide prevention literacy may be lower among young men, this group show amenability to changing beliefs. There were some indications that young men have a greater propensity to regard the workplace as having a role in reducing suicide rates and addressing mental health,
Subject Mental Health
Building Construction Management and Project Planning
Keyword(s) Mental health
Suicide
Age
Men
Construction workers
Beliefs
Intervention
Workplace
DOI - identifier 10.3390/ijerph16030475
Copyright notice This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
ISSN 1660-4601
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 24 Abstract Views, 18 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 26 Mar 2019, 09:36:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us