Clostridium perfringens-mediated necrotic enteritis is not influenced by the pre-existing microbiota but is promoted by large changes in the post-challenge microbiota

Lacey, J, Stanley, D, Keyburn, A, Ford, M, Chen, H, Johanesen, P, Lyras, D and Moore, R 2018, 'Clostridium perfringens-mediated necrotic enteritis is not influenced by the pre-existing microbiota but is promoted by large changes in the post-challenge microbiota', Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 227, pp. 119-126.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Clostridium perfringens-mediated necrotic enteritis is not influenced by the pre-existing microbiota but is promoted by large changes in the post-challenge microbiota
Author(s) Lacey, J
Stanley, D
Keyburn, A
Ford, M
Chen, H
Johanesen, P
Lyras, D
Moore, R
Year 2018
Journal name Veterinary Microbiology
Volume number 227
Start page 119
End page 126
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Abstract Problem addressed: Clostridium perfringens is the etiological agent of necrotic enteritis in chickens. As necrotic enteritis is a gastrointestinal disease, the interactions of pathogenic C. perfringens strains with the complex microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract may influence disease development and severity of disease. Objective: In this study the interactions of a pathogenic strain of C. perfringens, WER-NE36, with the microbiota of broilers was investigated to determine whether the pre-existing microbiota could influence disease outcomes in the necrotic enteritis challenge model. Methods and approach: Faecal microbiota compositions were measured before and after C. perfringens challenge and caecal microbiota was also characterised at necropsy. The microbiota profiles from individual birds were related back to the degree of necrotic enteritis that each bird developed. Results: Under the experimental conditions used the pre-existing microbiota did not have an effect on disease outcomes. However, C. perfringens challenge was shown to have a significant effect on the microbiota of broilers, regardless of disease status, by displacement of commensal clostridia. Conclusions: The microbiota signature after challenge resembled that of lower productivity birds, supporting the finding that physically obvious disease (necrotic lesions), as well as dysbiosis, are associated with shifts in gut microbiota and affect broiler performance, increasing costs to the poultry industry.
Subject Veterinary Microbiology (excl. Virology)
Keyword(s) 16S rRNA
Chicken
Clostridium perfringens
Dysbiosis
Microbiota
Necrotic enteritis
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.10.022
Copyright notice © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN 0378-1135
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