Spatial Distribution of Novel and Legacy Brominated Flame Retardants in Soils Surrounding Two Australian Electronic Waste Recycling Facilities

McGrath, T, Morrison, P, Ball, A and Clarke, B 2018, 'Spatial Distribution of Novel and Legacy Brominated Flame Retardants in Soils Surrounding Two Australian Electronic Waste Recycling Facilities', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 52, no. 15, pp. 8194-8204.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Spatial Distribution of Novel and Legacy Brominated Flame Retardants in Soils Surrounding Two Australian Electronic Waste Recycling Facilities
Author(s) McGrath, T
Morrison, P
Ball, A
Clarke, B
Year 2018
Journal name Environmental Science and Technology
Volume number 52
Issue number 15
Start page 8194
End page 8204
Total pages 11
Publisher American Chemical Society
Abstract Informal recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) has been shown to cause significant brominated flame retardant (BFR) contamination of surrounding soils in a number of Asian and West African countries. However, to the authors' knowledge, there have been no published studies demonstrating polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) and novel brominated flame retardant (NBFR) soil contamination from regulated "formal" e-waste processing facilities in developed countries. This study reports on PBDEs (-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -183, and -209) and NBFRs (PBT, PBEB, HBB, EH-TBB, BTBPE and DBDPE) in 36 soil samples surrounding two Australian e-waste recycling plants and a further eight reference soils. Overall SPBDE concentrations ranged 0.10-98 000 ng/g dw (median; 92 ng/g dw) and SNBFRs ranged ND-37 000 ng/g dw (median 2.0 ng/g dw). Concentrations in soils were found to be significantly negatively associated with distance from one of the e-waste facilities for Spenta-BDEs, BDE-183, BDE-209, and SNBFR compound groups. ANOVA tests further illustrated the potential for e-waste recycling to significantly elevate concentrations of some BFRs in soils over distances up to 900 m compared to references sites. This study provides the first evidence of soil contamination with PBDEs and NBFRs originating from formal e-waste recycling facilities in Australia, which may have implications for e-waste recycling practices throughout the world.
Subject Analytical Chemistry not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.1021/acs.est.8b02469
Copyright notice © 2018 American Chemical Society
ISSN 0013-936X
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