Carnosine supplementation improves serum resistin concentrations in overweight or obese otherwise healthy adults: A pilot randomized trial

Baye, E, Ukropec, J, de Courten, M, Mousa, A, Kurdiova, T, Johnson, J, Wilson, K, Plebanski, M, Aldini, G, Ukropcova, B and de Courten, B 2018, 'Carnosine supplementation improves serum resistin concentrations in overweight or obese otherwise healthy adults: A pilot randomized trial', Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 1-10.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Carnosine supplementation improves serum resistin concentrations in overweight or obese otherwise healthy adults: A pilot randomized trial
Author(s) Baye, E
Ukropec, J
de Courten, M
Mousa, A
Kurdiova, T
Johnson, J
Wilson, K
Plebanski, M
Aldini, G
Ukropcova, B
de Courten, B
Year 2018
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 9
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPIAG
Abstract Adipokines play an important role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. We have previously shown that carnosine supplementation in overweight or obese non-diabetic individuals improves glucose metabolism but does not change adiponectin concentrations. However, its effect on other adipokines has not been investigated. Herein we further determined the effect of carnosine supplementation on serum adipsin, resistin and leptin. Twenty-two overweight or obese otherwise healthy adults were randomly assigned to receive either 2 g of carnosine (n = 13) or identically looking placebo (n = 9) for 12 weeks. Serum adipsin, leptin and resistin were analyzed using a bead-based multiplex assay. Carnosine supplementation decreased serum resistin concentrations compared to placebo (mean change from baseline: -35 ± 83 carnosine vs. 35 ± 55 ng/mL placebo, p = 0.04). There was a trend for a reduction in serum leptin concentrations after carnosine supplementation (-76 ± 165 ng/mL carnosine vs. 20 ± 28 ng/mL placebo, p = 0.06). The changes in leptin and resistin concentrations were inversely related to the change in concentration for urinary carnosine (r = -0.72, p = 0.0002; r = -0.67, p = 0.0009, respectively), carnosine-propanal (r = -0.56, p = 0.005; r = -0.63, p = 0.001, respectively) and carnosine-propanol (r = -0.61, p = 0.002; r = -0.60, p = 0.002, respectively). There were no differences between groups in change in adipsin concentrations. Our findings show carnosine supplementation may normalize some, but not all, of the serum adipokine concentrations involved in glucose metabolism, in overweight and obese individuals. Further clinical trials with larger samples are needed to confirm these results.
Subject Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Adipokines
Cardiovascular disease
Carnosine
Obesity
Type 2 diabetes
DOI - identifier 10.3390/nu10091258
Copyright notice © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
ISSN 2072-6643
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