The immediate effects of an intervention based on the Bobath concept on balance and gait in people with multiple sclerosis

Ilett, P, Lythgo, N, Martin, C and Brock, K 2015, 'The immediate effects of an intervention based on the Bobath concept on balance and gait in people with multiple sclerosis', Physiotherapy, vol. 101, no. Supplement1, pp. 176-176.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title The immediate effects of an intervention based on the Bobath concept on balance and gait in people with multiple sclerosis
Author(s) Ilett, P
Lythgo, N
Martin, C
Brock, K
Year 2015
Journal name Physiotherapy
Volume number 101
Issue number Supplement1
Start page 176
End page 176
Total pages 1
Publisher Elsevier
Abstract Background: The Bobath concept is a physiotherapy approach widely used in the treatment of Multiple sclerosis (MS). Interventions involving treatment of the foot and ankle are a strong focus of the Bobath concept, with the aim of improving postural control at the dynamic interface between the person and the base of support. We were unable to identify any studies investigating the effect of these interventions on postural control, or studies assessing postural control in higher level balance tasks, such as single leg stance, in people with MS. Purpose: (1) To investigate the immediate change after a single intervention based on the Bobath concept on people with MS. (2) To compare the balance and gait of people with MS with healthy controls. Methods: Participants in the study were people with MS with self reported gait and balance deficits. Exclusion criteria included inability to stand in single leg stance (SLS) on the most impaired leg. Participants were age and gender matched with healthy controls. Balance was assessed by ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure movements during SLS, and two clinical tests, the Lateral Reach Test (LRT) and the Four Square Step Test (FSST). Gait was evaluated by GRF, ankle kinematics and spatiotemporal measures. The Bobath based intervention focused on mobilising and activating the most impaired foot and ankle in sitting. The treatment was tailored for each individual to address their specific impairments of the foot and ankle. Key components were provision of sensory information, stretch of intrinsic muscles of the foot to selectively activate the foot, improving alignment of the talo- crural joint and activation of gastrocnemius. Eleven people with MS were recruited to the study and 11 healthy controls. Baseline measures in the MS group showed significantly greater vertical GRF variability (p = 0.008) during SLS, less distance reached on the LRT (p = 0.001) and slower completion of the FSST (p < 0.001) than healthy cont
Subject Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Multiple sclerosis
Balance
Bobath concept
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.332
Copyright notice © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
ISSN 1873-1465
Versions
Version Filter Type
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 8 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 26 Mar 2019, 09:36:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us