Development of a simplified computational model to study cranial backspatter using SPH

Kwon, E, Malhotra, A, Das, R, Fernandez, J and Taylor, M 2015, 'Development of a simplified computational model to study cranial backspatter using SPH', in G. R. Liu and Raj Das (ed.) Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computational Methods (ICCM 2015), Auckland, New Zealand, 14-17 July 2015, pp. 809-815.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Development of a simplified computational model to study cranial backspatter using SPH
Author(s) Kwon, E
Malhotra, A
Das, R
Fernandez, J
Taylor, M
Year 2015
Conference name ICCM 2015
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 14-17 July 2015
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computational Methods (ICCM 2015)
Editor(s) G. R. Liu and Raj Das
Publisher Scientech
Place of publication United States
Start page 809
End page 815
Total pages 7
Abstract Investigation of crime requires rigorous testing and sound scientific understanding of the evidence to assist with the reconstruction of the criminal event. From the multitude of forensic specializations, bloodstain pattern analysis evidence from cranial gunshot wounding is of particular interest because of the high mortality rate resulting from head wounding compared to other body parts. Traditionally, animal models and physical models of the human anatomy have been used to study the mechanism and extent of ballistic spatter, including backspatter. Backspatter is a retrograde spattering of the target material from the entry wound. The reverse directionality of backspatter has specific evidential value, as it may establish a link between the victim and the shooter via transfer of biological matter. Backspatter evidence has also been used in courts to distinguish between a homicide and a suicide. Despite the importance of backspatter, the understanding of its mechanism has remained inadequate due to ethical issues, difference in anatomical geometry associated with various animal samples, or material property difference among biological and synthetic materials used in physical models. Hence there is a need to develop simulation tools that will use computational models of cranium geometry and configurations relatively similar to those of humans. Such computational models can act as alternatives to animal or physical models for the investigation of backspatter in a variety of situations.
Subjects Materials Engineering not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) ballistic impact
backspatter
forensic biomechanics
cranial injury
computational modelling
smoothed particle hydrodynamics
hypervelocity impact
Copyright notice © 2015 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
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