Child independent mobility: Making the case, and understanding how the physical and social environments impact on the behaviour

Badland, H 2012, 'Child independent mobility: Making the case, and understanding how the physical and social environments impact on the behaviour' in Turunen E, Koskinen A (ed.) Urbanization and the Global Environment, Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp. 51-79.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title Child independent mobility: Making the case, and understanding how the physical and social environments impact on the behaviour
Author(s) Badland, H
Year 2012
Title of book Urbanization and the Global Environment
Publisher Nova Science Publishers
Place of publication New York
Editor(s) Turunen E, Koskinen A
Start page 51
End page 79
Subjects Urban Design
Summary Within a context of rapidly changing environments and increased understanding of the complex relationship between environments and health, child independent mobility has gained much interest of late. By definition, child independent mobility requires a child to be mobile, thereby encompasses active transportation behaviors such as walking and cycling, but may also include other modes such as scootering and skateboarding as these modes can be accessed by youth. Traveling by active modes provides important opportunities to accumulate health-promoting levels of activity, and to develop skills, habits, and confidence for lifelong participation in independent travel. 'Independence' for children is generally considered to be without adult supervision but may be with peers, as opposed to travelling alone (although this may often be the case). These two constructs form the definition of child independent mobility that will be used throughout this chapter. The overarching notion of child independent mobility is that children as a group are agents in their own life worlds, and that independent mobility provides children opportunities to participate in travel and play behaviors that are free from the constraints imposed by adult presence. Without independent mobility, children may lack autonomy and be restricted to the life worlds of adults, by either being chauffeured from location to location, or simply being contained within the home environment where they can be continually observed. This chapter asserts the importance of child independent mobility within a broad framework, and examines how changes to the physical and social environment have influenced this behavior, techniques to assess children's independent travel, and briefly reviews relevant interventions.
Copyright notice © 2012 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc
ISBN 9781614702887
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