Additional structured physical activity does not improve walking in older people ( 60 years) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation: a randomised trial

Said, C, Morris, M, McGinley, J and Churilov, L., et al, 2018, 'Additional structured physical activity does not improve walking in older people ( 60 years) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation: a randomised trial', Journal of Physiotherapy, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 237-244.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Additional structured physical activity does not improve walking in older people ( 60 years) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation: a randomised trial
Author(s) Said, C
Morris, M
McGinley, J
Churilov, L., et al,
Year 2018
Journal name Journal of Physiotherapy
Volume number 64
Issue number 4
Start page 237
End page 244
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier Australia
Abstract Questions: Among older people receiving inpatient rehabilitation, does additional supervised physical activity lead to faster self-selected gait speed at discharge? Does additional supervised physical activity lead to better mobility, function and quality of life at discharge and 6 months following discharge? Design: Multi-centre, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Older people (age > 60 years) from two Australian hospitals undergoing rehabilitation to improve mobility. Intervention: Participants received multidisciplinary care, including physiotherapy. During hospital rehabilitation, the experimental group (n = 99) spent additional time daily performing physical activities that emphasised upright mobility tasks; the control group (n = 99) spent equal time participating in social activities. Outcome measures: Self-selected gait speed was the primary outcome at discharge and a secondary outcome at the 6-month follow-up. Timed Up and Go, De Morton Mobility Index, Functional Independence Measure and quality of life were secondary outcomes at discharge and tertiary outcomes at the 6-month follow-up. Results: The experimental group received a median of 20 additional minutes per day (IQR 15.0 to 22.5) of upright activities for a median of 16.5 days (IQR 10.0 to 25.0). Gait speed did not differ between groups at discharge. Mean gait speed was 0.51 m/s (SD 0.29) in the experimental group and 0.56 m/s (SD 0.28) in the control group (effect size -0.06 m/s, 95% CI -0.12 to 0.01, p = 0.096). No significant differences were detected in other secondary measures. Conclusion: While substantial gains in mobility were achieved by older people receiving inpatient rehabilitation, additional physical activity sessions did not lead to better walking outcomes at discharge or 6 months. Trial registration: ACTRN12613000884707. [Said CM, Morris ME, McGinley JL, Szoeke C, Workman B, Liew D, H
Subject Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Exercise therapy
Hospitalisation
Mobility limitation
Randomised controlled trial
Rehabilitation
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.jphys.2018.08.006
Copyright notice © 2018 Australian Physiotherapy Association. CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
ISSN 1836-9553
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