Engaging Professionals in Sustainable Workplace Innovation: Medical Doctors and Institutional Work

Bartram, T, Stanton, P, Bamber, G, Leggat, S, Ballardie, R and Gough, R 2018, 'Engaging Professionals in Sustainable Workplace Innovation: Medical Doctors and Institutional Work', British Journal of Management, vol. 00, pp. 1-14.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Engaging Professionals in Sustainable Workplace Innovation: Medical Doctors and Institutional Work
Author(s) Bartram, T
Stanton, P
Bamber, G
Leggat, S
Ballardie, R
Gough, R
Year 2018
Journal name British Journal of Management
Volume number 00
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Abstract This paper investigates the role of medical professionals in the success and longevity of the implementation of workplace innovation and organizational change in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Departments of two large public hospitals, in Australia and Canada, during the introduction of process improvement using Lean Management (LM) methodologies. We ask why and how doctors resist, influence or enable LM initiatives in healthcare. Using a qualitative methodology, we contribute to institutional work theory by unpacking the complex forms of boundary and practice work undertaken by key actors who effectively use their professional status and power to enable practice changes to be embedded. Our findings lend support to the importance of the involvement and ownership of senior doctors in the design, introduction and implementation of successful workplace innovation and organizational change. Senior doctors use their professional expertise, positional and political power at the industry, organization and workplace levels to influence strategically the use of resources designated for workplace innovation to improve efficiencies, quality of patient care and maintain their dominance. The significant organizational change achieved reflected the ownership and leadership of the workplace innovation by senior doctors in 'hybrid roles' who captured the rhetoric and minimized adversarialism among key stakeholders.
Subject Human Resources Management
DOI - identifier 10.1111/1467-8551.12335
Copyright notice © 2018 The Author(s).
ISSN 1045-3172
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