Caring for aged people: The influence of personal resilience and workplace climate on 'doing good' and 'feeling good'

McNeil, N, Bartram, T, Cregan, C, Ellis, J and Cooke, F 2019, 'Caring for aged people: The influence of personal resilience and workplace climate on 'doing good' and 'feeling good'', Journal of Advanced Nursing, pp. 1-13.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Caring for aged people: The influence of personal resilience and workplace climate on 'doing good' and 'feeling good'
Author(s) McNeil, N
Bartram, T
Cregan, C
Ellis, J
Cooke, F
Year 2019
Journal name Journal of Advanced Nursing
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Abstract Aims: This study examines the impact of personal resilience on the well-being of care workers and how perceptions of the quality of care provided and the social climate in the organization influences this relationship. We examine quality of patient care as both a mediating and outcome variable to better understand if 'doing good' (quality of care) leads to 'feeling good' (personal well-being). Background: As an ageing population and the care for the older people has become an increasing challenge to many societies, developing and retaining a professional care workforce through effective management is vital in providing care services. Design: A cross-sectional regression design was used in the study. Methods: In 2017 we surveyed care workers in 20 Australian aged care facilities. The sample consist of 194 usable questionnaires. Using regression techniques, we constructed an interaction term (resilience × social climate) and investigated its impact on well-being (the outcome variable) and quality of care (the mediator variable). Results: Our results reveal that quality of care is important as an outcome variable particularly in a supportive climate where high personal resilience positively influences quality of care. Quality of care is also important as a mediating variable as it provides a conduit through which high personal resilience fosters well-being, especially in a supportive climate. Our results support the argument that 'doing good' leads to 'feeling good'. Conclusion: These findings contribute to our appreciation of the important outcomes of resilience in the aged care context and its influence on perceived performance and carer well-being.
Subject Human Resources Management
Keyword(s) adult nursing
Australia
carers
management
nurses
quality of care
DOI - identifier 10.1111/jan.13935
Copyright notice © 2019 John Wiley & Sons
ISSN 0309-2402
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Created: Mon, 29 Apr 2019, 13:04:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
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