Mobile phone use while riding a motorcycle and crashes among university students

Truong, L, Nguyen, H and De Gruyter, C 2019, 'Mobile phone use while riding a motorcycle and crashes among university students', Traffic Injury Prevention, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 204-210.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Mobile phone use while riding a motorcycle and crashes among university students
Author(s) Truong, L
Nguyen, H
De Gruyter, C
Year 2019
Journal name Traffic Injury Prevention
Volume number 20
Issue number 2
Start page 204
End page 210
Total pages 7
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Abstract Objective: Motorcycle crashes are a significant road safety challenge, particularly in many low- and middle-income countries where motorcycles represent the vast majority of their vehicle fleet. Though risky riding behaviors, such as speeding and riding under the influence of alcohol, have been identified as important contributors to motorcycle crashes, little is understood about the effect of using a mobile phone while riding on motorcycle crash involvement. This article investigates crash involvement among motorcycle riders with risky riding behaviors, particularly using a mobile phone while riding. Methods: Data were obtained from an online survey of university students' risky riding behaviors in Vietnam administered between March and May 2016 (n = 665). Results: Results show that 40% of motorcycle riders reported to have experienced a crash/fall and nearly 24% of motorcycle riders indicated that they had been injured in a crash/fall. Effects of mobile phone use while riding on safety of motorcycle riders are highlighted. Specifically, more frequent use of a mobile phone for texting or searching for information while riding is associated with a higher chance of being involved in a crash/fall. The results also show that drink riding is associated with a higher chance of being injured. Conclusions: Overall this article reveals significant safety issues of using a mobile phone while riding a motorcycle, providing valuable insight for designing education and publicity campaigns.
Subject Transport Engineering
Transport Planning
Keyword(s) Risky behavior
motorcycle
mobile phone
crash
injury
DOI - identifier 10.1080/15389588.2018.1546048
Copyright notice © 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN 1538-9588
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