Artisanal Food Production and Marketing in the Perth Area Of Western Australia: Some Preliminary Indications of Difficulties with Classical Economics and Supply Chain Theory

Azavedo, M and Walsh, J 2018, 'Artisanal Food Production and Marketing in the Perth Area Of Western Australia: Some Preliminary Indications of Difficulties with Classical Economics and Supply Chain Theory', Management and Marketing, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 47-57.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Artisanal Food Production and Marketing in the Perth Area Of Western Australia: Some Preliminary Indications of Difficulties with Classical Economics and Supply Chain Theory
Author(s) Azavedo, M
Walsh, J
Year 2018
Journal name Management and Marketing
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Start page 47
End page 57
Total pages 11
Publisher Universitatea din Craiova
Abstract This paper derives from various pieces of research, quantitative and qualitative, among artisanal food producers in the Perth area of Western Australia. The research had a focus on the marketing aims of artisanal food producers associated with attendance at Victoria Park Farmers' Market. It was started so as to locate the motivations of these small-scale producers to be involved in food production at all. Major motivational themes quickly emerged. The first was freedom and the second was self-expression, while community feeling was also important as an other-orientated approach, which was slightly contradictory. Sub-themes also emerged, for instance the desire to promote community health. What was not relevant was the drive towards maximising income, creating substantial income, which is from the perspective of entrepreneurship or economic rationality. That rationality derives, of course, from the propositions of classical economics, which has been looking threadbare for some time. Ally the findings here with those from others from research work on consumers at Perth farmers' markets and consumers of the artisanal producers' products and this sense of irrationality was further confirmed. Purchasers were little concerned about prices. Ultimately, though, farmers' markets are characterized by high prices and irrationality in terms of classic supply chain theory, whereby the more that intermediaries are removed, the lower the price should be for the purchaser. That simply does not happen since there is a social element, even a relationship element, that is now being factored into price determination as consumers and farmers come face-to-face.
Subject Marketing Management (incl. Strategy and Customer Relations)
Keyword(s) farmers markets
vendors
attendance motivations
artisanal food producer motivations
Copyright notice © 2018 Craiova Management & Marketing Magazine All Rights Reserved
ISSN 1841-2416
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