Another Suburban Transition? Responding To Climate Change In The Australian Suburbs

Dalton, T 2017, 'Another Suburban Transition? Responding To Climate Change In The Australian Suburbs' in Trivess Moore; Fjalar de Haan; Ralph Horne and Brendan James Gleeson (ed.) Urban Sustainability Transitions: Australian cases-International Perspectives, Springer Nature, Singapore, pp. 193-212.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title Another Suburban Transition? Responding To Climate Change In The Australian Suburbs
Author(s) Dalton, T
Year 2017
Title of book Urban Sustainability Transitions: Australian cases-International Perspectives
Publisher Springer Nature
Place of publication Singapore
Editor(s) Trivess Moore; Fjalar de Haan; Ralph Horne and Brendan James Gleeson
Start page 193
End page 212
Subjects Human Geography not elsewhere classified
Summary This chapter considers the idea of destabilising the current high-carbon regime and establishing the preconditions for a new sociotechnical regime in Australian suburban cities. It does this in the following four sections. The first section argues that cities can be the site of sociotechnical regimes. In this case, the focus is on the suburbs as a sociotechnical regime within Australian cities. The second section describes the pattern of direct and indirect household energy consumption in large metropolitan cities, which are overwhelmingly suburban cities. This urban/suburban location of high energy-intensive household living is an integral element of the high-carbon sociotechnical regime. The third section argues that the underlying 'lock-in mechanisms' producing and reproducing the suburbs have at times been destabilised and reconfigured. It is important to understand what made the new 'lock-in mechanisms' viable because this can inform strategic thinking about future change. The fourth section draws a set of preconditions from the history of change in 'lock-in mechanisms' that should be considered in the development of transition to low-carbon suburban suburbs. It presents them at three levels - macro, meso and micro - as a means for clarifying the way different types of power is exercised in the making and remaking of energy intensive suburbs. The challenge is how might households live in and remake their cities while they continue to be suburban so that they are more sustainable.
Copyright notice © Springer Nature Singapore 2018
Keyword(s) suburbs
energy
housing
housing policy
lock-in
households
historical review
DOI - identifier 10.1007/978-981-10-4792-3_11
ISBN 9789811047923
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