A qualitative study of cancer care professionals' experiences of working with migrant patients from diverse cultural backgrounds

Broom, A, Parker, R, Kirby, E, Kokanovic, R, Woodland, L, Lwin, Z and Koh, E 2019, 'A qualitative study of cancer care professionals' experiences of working with migrant patients from diverse cultural backgrounds', BMJ Open, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1-10.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

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Title A qualitative study of cancer care professionals' experiences of working with migrant patients from diverse cultural backgrounds
Author(s) Broom, A
Parker, R
Kirby, E
Kokanovic, R
Woodland, L
Lwin, Z
Koh, E
Year 2019
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher B M J Group
Abstract To improve the experiences of people from diverse cultural backgrounds, there has been an increased emphasis on strengthening cultural awareness and competence in healthcare contexts. The aim of this focus-group based study was to explore how professionals in cancer care experience their encounters with migrant cancer patients with a focus on how they work with cultural diversity in their everyday practice, and the personal, interpersonal and institutional dimensions therein. This paper draws on qualitative data from eight focus groups held in three local health districts in major metropolitan areas of Australia. Participants were health professionals (n=57) working with migrants in cancer care, including multicultural community workers, allied health workers, doctors and nurses. Focus group discussions were audio recorded and transcribed in full. Data were analysed using the framework approach and supported by NVivo V.11 qualitative data analysis software. Four findings were derived from the analysis: (1) culture as merely one aspect of complex personhood; (2) managing culture at the intersection of institutional, professional and personal values; (3) balancing professional values with patient values and beliefs, and building trust and respect; and (4) the importance of time and everyday relations for generating understanding and intimacy, and for achieving culturally competent care. The findings reveal: how culture is often misconstrued as manageable in isolation; the importance of a renewed emphasis on culture as interpersonal and institutional in character; and the importance of prioritising the development of quality relationships requiring additional time and resource investments in migrant patients for enacting effective intercultural care.
Subject Sociology not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Australia
Cancer
Culture
Qualitative research
DOI - identifier 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025956
Copyright notice © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. Open access article distributed, Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license
ISSN 2044-6055
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