Comparative characterization of biochars produced at three selected pyrolysis temperatures from common woody and herbaceous waste streams

Askeland, M, Clarke, B and Paz-Ferreiro, J 2019, 'Comparative characterization of biochars produced at three selected pyrolysis temperatures from common woody and herbaceous waste streams', PeerJ, pp. 1-20.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Comparative characterization of biochars produced at three selected pyrolysis temperatures from common woody and herbaceous waste streams
Author(s) Askeland, M
Clarke, B
Paz-Ferreiro, J
Year 2019
Journal name PeerJ
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher PeerJ
Abstract Biochar, the product of biomass pyrolysis, has been explored as a soil amendment and carbon capture vessel. Recent literature has aligned biochar as a novel sorbent for a host of environmental contaminants. Through the variation of pyrolysis conditions, biochars can be engineered to have qualities desirable in sorbents whilst maintaining their agronomic benefits. This study focuses on identifying the effects that feedstock type and process temperature have on biochar characteristics which may in turn shed light on their potential environmental applications. Using this approach, six biochars were created from two waste biomasses. The biochars exhibited wide ranges of pH (5.611.1), surface area (16.2397.4 m2/g), electrical conductivity (192,826 mS/cm), fixed carbon (7297%), heavy metal and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Statistically significant trends (P <0:05) in biochar characteristics dependent upon increasing pyrolysis temperature and feedstock type were identified. Arsenic (>13 mg/kg), chromium (>93 mg/kg), copper (>143 mg/kg) and PAH (>6 mg/kg) concentrations presented themselves as obstacles to land application in a small number of biochars with respects to International Biochar Initiative (IBI) guidelines. However, it was demonstrated that these could be eliminated through employing pyrolysis processes which encompass higher temperatures (>500 C) and ensuring the use of contaminant-free feedstocks. The variation in surface areas, carbonized fractions and surface functional groups achieved suggest that using the correct feedstock and process, biochar could be produced in Victoria (Australia) from common organic waste streams to the ends of acting as a sorbent, soil enhancer, and a waste management strategy.
Subject Environmental Engineering not elsewhere classified
Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.7717/peerj.6784
Copyright notice © 2019 Askeland et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium and for any purpose provided that it is properly attributed. For attribution, the original author(s), title, publication source (PeerJ) and either DOI or URL of the article must be cited.
ISSN 2167-8359
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